Rise of the Innerpreneur
You are browsing the site archives by month.

Watching Culture Evolve: A New Cultural Creative Study To Be Released Soon

Creative Commons License photo credit: anarchosyn
Creative Commons License photo credit: anarchosyn

Wisdom University’s Institute for the Emerging Wisdom Culture, directed by sociologist Dr. Paul H. Ray (one of the original authors of The Cultural Creatives), has almost completed a major new study on America’s Cultural Creatives.

The findings of the study were set to be released in the Summer of 2008…but weren’t. I recently read that a Fall 2008 date was set. Any day now, I guess. I’ve signed up to be notified of the release of the Cultural Creative study and will be sure to write all about the findings.

7 Different Studies Throughout the World

The American study was conducted in conjunction with 6 similar Cultural Creative studies in:

  • France
  • Germany
  • Holland
  • Hungary
  • Italy
  • Japan

Our Name in Lights

The findings of these studies will support a documentary film produced by Taylor Thomson, a Canadian film producer, on how our group is dealing creatively with the global challenges confronting us, especially global warming.

And in Print too

Dr. Paul Ray and Dr. Jim Garrison are also writing a book designed to summarize the current research, support the themes of the documentary film, and explore the historical and cultural implications of CC’s as humans move into an intensely ecological phase of our history.

No doubt, this is a very exciting time for Cultural Creativity.

Hello! I’m Tara, a wizard of less obvious things. I love hearing from you, so please feel free to connect with me.

I deeply appreciate your support of my work—through allowing it to grow in your imagination, through sharing it with others, and through your financial support.

How Do You Tame Your Inner Critic?

Innerpreneur Inner Critic

I am my own worst critic. I know that much is true. According to me, nothing I do is good enough.

The Source of My Most Recent Uprising

Last Wednesday I was interviewed by Allie Osmar of The Creative Career, a blog that provides aspiring young Marketers and Communicators with insights into the evolving Creative industry.

During the interview, Allie spoke to me about my experiences emerging from university, working in marketing and my eventual evolution into an innerpreneur.

My First Podcast Interview about My Writing and Work

Before speaking with Allie, I’d never been interviewed for a podcast and I was worried about my ability to convey my ideas clearly (without being able to write and re-write them ad nausem).

After taping the interview with Allie, I was very disappointed in myself. All I could think of was how I could have said more, been more clear, not talked so fast, etc., etc., etc. I was certain I did a terrible job. I thought, I can’t bear to listen to it.

It’s Published – Going Against Mainstream Ideas of Success

This morning, Allie published my interview and the accompanying article, Going Against Mainstream Ideas of Success. It created anxiety in me to read and listen to it but once I did, surprisingly, I thought, “hmm…maybe I wasn’t so bad.” I feel much more confident today than I did the day we taped it.

Listen to the Podcast
Read the Article

Rearing Her Ugly Head Again

So, for now, my inner critic is momentarily silenced. But not really, because as I write this article, I start criticizing again. Just a moment ago, after reading over what I had wrote, I thought of erasing this article entirely.

I am not perfect, nor is my work. I need to accept that. Trouble is, I don’t know how. I know, in part, my ambition and perfectionism helped me to get where I am today but how do I ensure it continues to be a help not a hindrance in my work? What do you do to tame your inner critic?

Hello! I’m Tara, a wizard of less obvious things. I love hearing from you, so please feel free to connect with me.

I deeply appreciate your support of my work—through allowing it to grow in your imagination, through sharing it with others, and through your financial support.

The 4 Things We Need to Be Happy?

I watched a video today, from “Stories from the Near Future,” the 2008 New Yorker Conference, that spoke of happiness and how it is created by humans being involved in an economy of engagement.

Day 108/365 [Year 2]
photo credit: thp365

The presenter argued that many people today, because we have become so good at surviving, feel not good at life.

They feel that there is nothing left to conquer or solve, nothing left to engage them or give them purpose. She went on to argue that games and alternate realities are so popular today because they create an economy of engagement and exercise our need to survive.

The speaker argued that happiness is derived from four engagement principles:
  1. having satisfying work to do
  2. the experience of being good at something
  3. time spent with people we like
  4. the chance to be part of something bigger

Could it really be so simple? Is feeling engaged all humans need in order to feel happy?

Excitingly, the speaker also argues that as we evolve, games will be used more and more to engage people in actively creating social change. The website and interactive game World Without Oil is a current example of this idea in action.

Hello! I’m Tara, a wizard of less obvious things. I love hearing from you, so please feel free to connect with me.

I deeply appreciate your support of my work—through allowing it to grow in your imagination, through sharing it with others, and through your financial support.

Running the Numbers: An American Self-Portrait

Depicts 1.14 million brown paper supermarket bags, the number used in the US every hour.

Depicts 1.14 million brown paper supermarket bags, the number used in the US every hour. photo credit: Chris Jordan

I just learned of photographer/artist Chris Jordan’s brilliant exhibition, Running the Numbers: An American Self-Portrait. Chris combines specific quantities of something (such as plastic cups), statistics (one million plastic cups are used on airline flights in the US every six hours) and photographic inventiveness to present viewers with a real and stark understanding of America’s outrageous consumption patterns.

Depicts one million plastic cups, the number used on airline flights in the US every six hours. photo credit: Chris Jordan

You can view the complete Running the Numbers series on Chris Jordan’s website.

Keep in mind: The images are not Photoshop creations. You are viewing the actual number of items such as toothpicks, plastic bottles, etc. as enumerated in the captions.

Hello! I’m Tara, a wizard of less obvious things. I love hearing from you, so please feel free to connect with me.

I deeply appreciate your support of my work—through allowing it to grow in your imagination, through sharing it with others, and through your financial support.

Charter for Compassion

The Charter for Compassion is an inspired idea to create a charter to celebrate compassion and to promote a new collaboration between the world’s major religions. Here is a short video about it. Karen Armstrong, an insightful writer on comparative religion dreamed up this idea and TED has helped her to make it a reality.

This week millions of Muslims, Christians, and Jews will be sent an email inviting them to visit the site and offer their words for inspiring the world to focus on what the great religions share, as opposed to what divides them.

The Charter will accumulate world-wide input for next four weeks, select the best contributions with the help of a council of sages, made up of religious thinkers and leaders, and craft the world’s words into the final version of the Charter.

The document will not only speak to the core ideas of compassion but will also address the actions each of us can take to bring these ideas into the world more fully.

The Charter’s hope is to:

“show that the voice of negativity and violence so often associated with religion is the minority and that the voice of compassion is the majority. Through the participation of the grassroots, people around the world will expect more out of religious leaders and one another. In doing so, the Charter will shift conceptions of religion for all people.”

Help create the Charter for Compassion and aid the world in thinking differently about religion.

Hello! I’m Tara, a wizard of less obvious things. I love hearing from you, so please feel free to connect with me.

I deeply appreciate your support of my work—through allowing it to grow in your imagination, through sharing it with others, and through your financial support.