Rise of the Innerpreneur
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Shabnam Karimi: August 2013 Innerpreneur Spotlight

Shabnam Karimi

Shabnam Karimi
Founder
Project Doable!
Find us on YouTube \ on Facebook

I am:

A social entrepreneur.

My passion is for:

Connecting the world’s most creative and practical solutions to communities with systematically unmet needs.

My business helps you:

By engaging you in your global community, allowing you to utilize your networks, resources and knowledge to make the world a better place.

My biggest challenge is:

Winning over the pessimists.

I make a difference by:

Recognizing a gap in international development work and building a operational model that breeds sustainability and collaboration.

I have lots of ideas about:

How to engage communities in solving their own problems.

I’ve learned:

It’s always more difficult that it seems. You should expect that, plow through the challenges and more often than not there is a light at the end of the tunnel…it’s just that the tunnel is a lot longer than most people anticipate.

“The people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who actually do.” – Steve Jobs

If you would you like to be considered for an upcoming “Innerpreneur Spotlight”, please email me.

Hello! I’m Tara, a wizard of less obvious things. I love hearing from you, so please feel free to connect with me.

I deeply appreciate your support of my work—through allowing it to grow in your imagination, through sharing it with others, and through your financial support.

When Humans Attack!

photo credit: 69Vagamundos

There was nothing in the world I feared more then when humans attack.

So much so, that for a long time, I did my best to avoid humans altogether. To avoid them meant I wouldn’t be attacked.

I’d be safe.

But, the attacks still happened, despite my attempt to control and prevent them. No matter what I did, I couldn’t control how you behaved.

So I drove myself deeper into hiding. Thinking deep down there I would be safe.

I couldn’t help but feel that I was somehow responsible. I couldn’t help but attach to what kept happening. I couldn’t help but be hurt by them.

A loud motorcycle going by.

An attacking human, whether directing their stuff at me or not, is like a loud motorcycle going by.

They jar me, and perhaps even scare me with their presence and noise, but beyond the distraction they create, they do not need to affect me any further.

Their noise is not mine. I am not responsible to it.

I do not need to attach to the noise you create, and hold on to it. I do not need to attach to the content of your attack.

Like a motorcycle going by, I can’t control what you do. I may feel the shock of your actions, but I get to control how easily I recover from them.

I have a choice in whether I attach to your noise, and let it hurt me further. Or just let it go.

It’s just noise.

Unless I want it to be more.

A motorcycle, and an attack, may always surprise and shock me, and I may never like the sound, but what happens next, once you do what you wanted to do, is always my choice.

I can throw a dirty look at the driver, or cover my ears in protest, but the noise has already been created. I can’t change that.

But once the noise and the distraction has passed — that is when my work begins.

Do I attach to what happened and let it distract me further, or do I do what I can to let it go?

How much do I want it to affect me? Can I let it be the loud motorcycle going by, that bothers me for a moment and nothing more?

motorcycle analogy credit: Teya Sparks, photo credit: 69Vagamundos

Hello! I’m Tara, a wizard of less obvious things. I love hearing from you, so please feel free to connect with me.

I deeply appreciate your support of my work—through allowing it to grow in your imagination, through sharing it with others, and through your financial support.

Takers Gonna Take

It’s really lovely to know that through giving freely, I can inspire someone to be more giving.

Sometimes though, I encounter a person who consciously (or unconsciously) feels free to consistently take more than they give.

I need to watch my balance with them. For as much as I love to give, and to encourage it, I don’t enjoy feeling used.

With this kind of person, I need to check in with my giving self, and be honest about who they are and what they want from me.

Meet the Taker.

The Taker feels entitled to get more than they give. They feel owed — not just by me — but by the world.

And they are driven to do whatever they can to get what they feel they deserve.

For them, it’s not about an exchange, a give and take of equals, it’s about getting what they need.

They are a taker, and they’re gonna take.

All the giving in the world can not fill their lack.

I could blame the Taker.

But I stay away from them instead.

They’re so caught up in their own stuff, their own feelings of lack, that they can’t possibly see my value, let alone their own.

What they value is their needs fulfilled. What they see are things that could fill them.

To attempt to create an exchange with them will only leave me feeling their lack.

My love of giving can never change their love of taking.

Until they change it themself.

Hello! I’m Tara, a wizard of less obvious things. I love hearing from you, so please feel free to connect with me.

I deeply appreciate your support of my work—through allowing it to grow in your imagination, through sharing it with others, and through your financial support.