The Duty to Stay Connected

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We’ll connect when I’m good and ready

Why do we feel that it is our duty to be available whenever someone wants us? I am working to relinquish myself from this self-imposed duty to stay connected.

I like to connect, but I am not easy to connect with. Relatively speaking.

I don’t list my phone number and most phone calls are left for the machine to answer. I don’t own a smart phone and my emails are read and answered twice a day. I’m not on FaceBook. And I rarely instant message.

If you want to reach me you have three choices: phone, email and Twitter. Each of these tools allows me to control when I receive communication and when I respond to it. And that works for me.

You can keep your gadgets

I object to our society’s overriding belief that we can solve the problem of overcommitment by using more gadgets and more mediums to do more, more quickly and efficiently. More does not simplify. Thoughtful reduction simplifies.

As we create more mediums for communication, I find I’m becoming more selective. For my solution for coping with the overwhelm of overcommitment is not to seek more ways to stay connected but by maintaining simplicity and efficient systems in the avenues for connection that work for me.

I’ll keep my sanity

At times I still feel overwhelmed by the duty to stay connected, especially with email. But I’ve found those systems that I have established have allowed me to better maintain my focus, minimize interruptions and prevent me from feeling like I’ll never keep up.

Of course, I still have much room for improvement and I welcome your ideas for simplifying communication while still maintaining strong connections.

photo by: (Erick)

The Duty to Stay Connected

By Tara Joyce Time to Read: 1 min