Rise of the Innerpreneur

James Cervelloni: Innerpreneur Spotlight

James Cervelloni

JAMES CERVELLONI

Co-Founder, Partner and Certified Transformational Coach at
Mindopoly Center for Personal and Professional Change in Rochester, NY

Mindopoly Centre for Change @Mindopoly

I am:

a certified Changework professional with over 20 years of experience, specializing in Educational and Transformational Coaching.

My passion is for:

helping people discover who they really are behind the small story they have of themselves, and to find the One Thing they want most in life but rarely, if ever, get to have. I believe that the relentless quest for this One Thing is what drives everything people do, though often unknowingly, and in ways that ironically keep them from having it.

My business helps you:

to discover your Essential Self — what you might call your True Nature — to define the one thing you want most in life, and uncover and eliminate the hidden obstacles that are keeping you from having it. Mindopoly’s unique approach helps you realize the keys to unlocking your untapped potential by teaching you how to transform the way you see yourself and the world in a radically new way.

My biggest challenge is:

finding a larger stage to educate others about the unseen but All-Too-Obvious misperception most people have about the true cause of unhappiness, conflicts and suffering. At Mindopoly Center for Change we call it “The World’s Deadliest Belief.” Essentially, this belief holds as true that “other people, objects and events are the cause of how I think, feel and behave,” and that “I’m responsible for how others think, feel and behave.”

This core belief is the foundation of the social chaos in the world today. It’s responsible for the creation of the bully-victim relationship, the relentless need for control — often through violence — and is responsible for more pain, unhappiness and death in the world than all natural disasters combined.

Another challenge for me is mastering the power of social media and the influence one well-placed message can have. I’m currently working on a project that will help bring my message to a global audience.

I make a difference by:

helping people become aware of some basic truths:

  • You’re far more than who you think you are. Your Essential Okay-ness is independent of other’s opinions of you or circumstances outside of yourself. It isn’t a thing you have to ‘get.’ It’s the essence of your True Identity.
  • We all have life circumstances and challenges, many of which are outside of our control. However, the manner in which we meet these challenges and the meaning we make of them — for good or for bad — is up to each of us.
  • We give meaning to the people and things in our world through our beliefs and judgments. We assign them labels like good or bad and right or wrong based on our real or imagined experience with them. Judgments aren’t real in that they can’t be proven in a science lab as factual. Therefore, they’re not inherent in the natural world of people and things.
  • Each of us lives life according to what we believe to be true about the world and ourselves, even if what we believe to be true — isn’t.
  • Your greatest super power as a human being is your ability to create new empowering beliefs, meanings and judgments — and therefore a new reality. Learning to use this as a practical way of navigating life’s challenges is vital for living a self-empowered life.

I have lots of ideas about:

how The World’s Deadliest Belief is the main cause of conflict and suffering in personal, professional and world community relationships. I’m dedicated to teaching the one thing that you can do to change its influence on how you think, feel and behave. It’s a way to have peace in your world right now, even when the world at large seems insane. I believe that by changing this one perspective, we hold the power to change our world one mind at a time.

How educating kids about The World’s Deadliest Belief can end the rampant problem of bullying in schools today — in fact, bullying in all contexts.

How we need a practical approach to “Living-wise in an Other-wise World.” It’s the basis of Mindopoly’s Cooperative Engagement Model developed by my partner at Mindopoly, Lucia Pinizotti.

I’ve learned:

that the greatest cause of psychological suffering is that we believe our limited story of the world and who we are in it is true. It isn’t.

The proper treatment for unhappiness and many emotional ‘illnesses’ isn’t drugs. The cure is to correct the true cause — which in most cases is to correct erroneous thinking.

People are capable of great positive change and will embrace it willingly when their highest intentions are understood and honored.

In spite of appearances to the contrary, and though at times it may seem insane to try, it’s best to strive to see perfection. Most everything else is a symptom of the World’s Deadliest Belief.

A favourite quote of mine:

What you’re looking for is where you’re looking from. (Mooji)

If you would you like to be considered for an upcoming “Innerpreneur Spotlight”, please feel free to contact me.

Holding the Light

photo credit: Dave King

You make a difference by being what you truly are. You change your world by being the light you naturally are and by holding onto it, no matter what externally flies your way. In living your True Nature, you support others in realizing theirs.

Another can hurt you, or attempt to, but in knowing and holding your light, their is no need to reduce yourself in reaction to them — despite their desire for you to do so. Reacting to them with fear only results in you holding less of your light and in you feeling less than. The cycle of fear and of drama continues.

When you can accept the pain you feel, you can find the strength and presence to respond with your light. You have the right to hold the light you naturally are, no matter what externally flies your way. You have the power to respond to other people’s darkness (and your own) with fairness and compassion.

Others darkness and how they use it does not have to change your light. Unless you choose for it to.

photo credit: Dave King

Joyful Holiday Wishes for You

MerryChristmas2014

I love the magical feeling this season brings. While it may be snowing and storming (literally and metaphorically) outside our windows, within we have our love to keep us warm.

May you enjoy and share in the warmth and cheer this magical season brings!

All my love and my warmest wishes for a joyful and abundant 2015,

TJSignature

Ho, Ho, Ho!

photo credit: Bud

If Our Stories Were Our Truth, We Might Call Them That

photo credit Alessandra Di Nunno

We share stories to share our voice and our perspective in a way we feel will be emotionally impactful. We craft our stories in a particular way, changing them each time we tell them. We craft them from our experience and imagination, and the beautifully unique way we each perceive our world. They’re not the truth, nor our truth. They are our stories.

It’s not even the whole story that we get the privilege of hearing or sharing with each other when we’re storytelling. It’s only a glimpse that we can see, and/or show in our moment of connection together. It might sound like the complete story I’m sharing but please believe me, it’s only part of a greater whole. The truth, my truth, is far more nuanced and complex than my story can share.

If our stories were our truth, we might call them that.

I love stories… but I don’t put a lot of energy into them. My stories and the stories of others are here to entertain, to persuade, to educate but to take them as “the truth” or to hold my own experiences up to them in comparison, is a game I’d rather not play.

I’d rather work on treating stories lightly, for my own health and happiness. They are not “the truth”, nor “my truth”. Our stories are a reflection of us and our own unique way of perceiving things. They’re our version of events. They’re our tools for connection, for empathy and for identity. They’re integral to us but they are not, and can not, be all that we are. We are so much more than our stories.

photo credit: Alessandra Di Nunno

You’re So Much More Than Your Story

photo credit Venture Vancouver

There’s a growing phenomenon in Business, specifically in Marketing and Branding trends, of increasingly emphasizing the importance of telling your story — or more truthfully, selling your story.

This concept confuses me.

Asking me what my story is confuses me. You knowing what your story is confuses me.

When I’m asked what my story is, for instance, I may think about my “Innerpreneurial” story just to help my mind focus, but even then I fragment into a million directions. Do I want to share about getting my business starting? Do I want to share about reclaiming my artist and overcoming my creative and mental blocks? Or do I share how I’ve managed my home when both my husband and I are entrepreneurs? What about how I’ve needed to and have completely redesigned my life and world? Where and what part of my life experience is the part that sells?

Maybe this whole story business is suppose to confuse me. Maybe there’s benefit for me to be confused and feeling unsure. Maybe there’s benefit to you seeming clear in your story, and I, not. Maybe then I will more easily buy your story.

Maybe I’m to be confused by the idea that I have one powerful story to tell and sell, and that I can neatly fit my life and my experiences into it. Maybe that’s the point. To present life, or me, or my product, as more simple and clear, together and whole, than your life currently is. Maybe then you will buy the story I’m selling and telling.

There are so very many experiences and learning within me that when I attempt to present you with just one, I wholly feel the incompleteness of the perspective I am presenting. This feeling leaves me wondering, how valuable is it for us to be attached to our own and others stories? What value do we get from these stories we repeat about our Self and others?

There are so many potential stories within us, the ones we attach to and share, what do they say about us and how helpful are they?

photo credit: Venture Vancouver